Cornforth Images

Tag Archives: Volcanoes National Park
Kamokuna Lava Firehose 1

Kamokuna Lava Firehose 1

Posted by Jon Cornforth on March 29, 2017

This past January, I visited the Big Island of Hawaii in order to photograph lava from the ongoing eruption of Kilauea Volcano. I had intended to fly over there since I moved to Kauai last summer, but settling into my new island life kept getting in the way. Fortunately, I waited until until the right time and was rewarded with several days of incredible viewing of the dramatic “firehose” at the Kamokuna ocean entry. I hiked out to the main lava viewing area with some fellow photographers several days in a row, but on my final day decided to try the famous lava boat and shoot from the water. I had always poo-pooed the boat with its 50 passengers, but am glad that my buddy insisted that we try it. This is one of my favorite images because the lava can clearly be seen dramatically pouring out of the cliff while the steam cloud glows orange in the pre-dawn light. It was the experience of a lifetime.

Halemaʻumaʻu Crater Twilight 1

Halemaʻumaʻu Crater Twilight 1

Posted by Jon Cornforth on February 19, 2014

I recently spent two nights photographing the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater in Volcanoes National Park. It had been several years since I last photographed lava, so it was like visiting an old friend. The first night, I was happy to share some conversation in the dark with my buddy CJ Kale, who also allowed me to borrow his Canon 24mm f1.4 lens. This image was from my second night shooting solo. It was amazing to observe the crater and the steam plume begin to glow red after the sun went down. I framed the crater with this ohia tree located near the Jaggar Museum. I created this image using my Canon 5DmkIIICanon 24mm f1.4 lens, and Singh-Ray 3-stop Soft Graduated Neutral Density filter. I processed the RAW file using Aperture 3, Photoshop CC, and Nik Software’s Color Efex 4‘s White Neutralizer filter.

Mazama Ridge Fall Colors 1

Mazama Ridge Fall Colors 1

Posted by Jon Cornforth on October 6, 2010

The most important thing I teach my photography tour clients is how to anticipate a shot. Let’s use my new image of the fall colors on Mazama Ridge as an example of when to shoot. When I was at Mount Rainier National Park last Friday, the sky was clear blue without a single cloud on the horizon. I knew that the best image in these conditions would be when the angle of the sunlight was a few degrees above the horizon and still yellow or orange in color. Experience has taught me where the sun would go down, but I confirmed my guess by using my SunSeeker app on my iPhone. I wanted to shoot this scene as the sunset light settled into the trees and danced across the foliage in front of my camera. The tree shadows added some mystery to an otherwise beautiful but non-dramatic scene. This light only lasted for about 30 seconds before the foliage went into complete shade. I used my Carl Zeiss 35mm f2 ZE lens along with my Singh-Ray LB Warming Polarizer and 2-stop Hard Graduated Neutral Density filter to create this image using only 1 exposure which required minimal processing.

Mazama Ridge Lupine Sunrise 1

Mazama Ridge Lupine Sunrise 1

Posted by Jon Cornforth on August 21, 2010

This past Friday, the second in a row, I woke up at 2:30am and drove down to Mount Rainier National Park to photograph wildflowers at sunrise. I have sold a lot of images of Mount Rainier over the years, so it is worth taking the time out of my busy travel schedule to do the quick round trip for just 1 hour of shooting. I parked my car at 5:15am and ran up the trail in about 20 minutes to my favorite flower meadows on Mazama Ridge. I’m always surprised that I never encounter any other photographers up there at sunrise, but I also only visit during the week to avoid the weekend crowds.  For anyone still planning a trip to Rainier, the wildflowers are at their peak, however, I would not describe this year’s bloom as more than ordinary.  I did not encounter any diverse fields of wildflowers and the clouds from the day before had vanished, but I still hoped to create a new unique image. All of my previous well-known photos of wildflowers at Mount Rainier were created using medium and large format film cameras. What a pain in the ass that was. With my large format camera in particular, I had to compose the image using a dark cloth, focusing loupe, and dark ground glass where the image was upside down and reversed, spot meter the scene, stop down to f32, place a Singh-Ray non-LB Warming Polarizer on the lens, position the grad filter correctly, and hope that the wind stopped blowing for a 10-30 second exposure because I was using Fuji Velvia 50 film rated at ISO 25 due to reciprocity failure. Still with me? Let me just state unequivocally that creating this image with my dSLR was a lot easier. I like this picture because of the soft warm light illuminating the lupine in the foreground.

Gesellschaft Deutscher Tierfotografen 2010 Interview

Gesellschaft Deutscher Tierfotografen 2010 Interview

Posted by Jon Cornforth on July 14, 2010

I was recently interviewed by the Gesellschaft Deutscher Tierfotografen (Society of German Nature Photographers).  Previously interviewed photographers include Andy Rouse, George and Verena Popp, Norbert Rosing, and Kevin Schafer.  My interview is currently featured in their triannual magazine Forum Naturfotografie.  It spans 14 pages and showcases 12 of my favorite photographs.  The double page opener is my image “East Pond Vent 1”, taken in Volcanoes National Park in Hawaii.  You can view the entire article here, however, it is in German.

Seattle Met June 2010 Hiking Opener

Seattle Met June 2010 Hiking Opener

Posted by Jon Cornforth on July 8, 2010

My image “Spray Park Wildflowers 1” is featured as the double page opener of the hiking feature in the June 2010 issue of Seattle Met. Spray Park is my favorite alpine location at Mount Rainier National Park and is the closest side of the mountain to my home in Seattle. During the brief summer hiking season, I depart my house in the early afternoon, drive for about 3 hours, and hike the 3 miles up to the wildflower meadows to photograph the sunset. It is both a blessing and a curse if the wind is not blowing, a blessing because the fields of lupine and paintbrush are not blowing around in the wind, but a curse because of  the swarms of blood-thirsty mosquitoes that rival any that I have seen in Alaska or Canada. Spray Park is higher than Paradise on the south side of the mountain, so the wildflowers peak about 1 week later, typically mid-August. Based on the cold summer that we are having, I estimate that the wildflowers are going to be a little late this year, which is similar to the year that I created this image during the last week of August.

Hawai’i Magazine Cover January 2008

Posted by Jon Cornforth on January 2, 2008

The new issue of Hawai’i magazine has just hit the newsstand and I have the cover image! I provided them with several images a few months ago. They were so impressed with my work that they decided to use my image “East Pond Lava Vent” on the cover of their February issue which commemorates the 25th Anniversary of the Kilauea eruption that started on Jan 3, 1983. Please visit my Publication Credits page to learn more about my nature photography publishing business or visit my Hawaii Volcanoes National Park page to see more of my Hawaiian images.

East Pond Vent 5

2006 Nature’s Best Photography Awards

Posted by Jon Cornforth on November 3, 2006

My image, “East Pond Lava Vent” (vertical) was published in Nature’s Best magazine’s 2006 Photography Awards issue. It was recently selected from the 120 images that made up the awards to be one of the few images on display in the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in Washington, DC this winter. It was awarded Highly Honored in the Art In Nature Category.  The exhibit opens Nov 16th to the public and will run through April 2007.